Best Toys for Blind Dogs: Scented Toys

In my last post I looked at toys which are great for blind dogs because they use sounds which help blind dogs follow and interact with them. Another way of helping your dog locate its toys is to use toys that have a strong smell.

1031 Old Soul Orbee GroupThere are some great scented toys on the market, such as the durable range of rubber toys by Planet Dog which are mint scented. The Orbee Tough for senior dogs is particularly good, it’s high contrast colours make it easier for partially sighted dogs to spot it and there is a place to put treats, peanut butter cream or cheese  for added interest. It’s also worth checking our the eco friendly range of vanilla scented dog toys by BecoThings.

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You can scent your dogs toys in different ways. For soft toys like plush toys or rope toys, try adding a small amount of scented extract,such as vanilla or mint to the toy. You could even add a different scent to each toy and train your dog to identify them by name.

For hard toys and squeaky toys try placing the toys in a zip-lock bag with strong smelling food such as a pig’s ear or dried liver, for several days so they absorb the smell. You can also try soaking solid toys in meat stock for a few hours. The scent will eventually wear off so you will need to refresh it every so often.

BristleBoneFinally, any toy which you can use with food will smell so enticing that any dog will want to interact with it! You could try the iconic Kong, or one of the great products from BusyBuddy which you can combine with edible chew treats.

Using these methods, there’s no reason your blind dog can’t enjoy almost all the same toys as a sighted dog. You can help your dog rediscover tug toys, chew toys and plush toys again, by following the tips above and spending time encouraging him to play again.

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Best Toys for Blind Dogs: Noisy Toys

A lot of people have come to this blog looking for advice on living with a blind dog, and in particular toys that are  suitable for blind or partially sighted dogs. Most of the interactive toys that we review are suitable for blind dogs, deaf dogs and dogs with all 5 senses, and they have been tried and tested by BlindDog.

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Many owners of blind dogs are worried that they will lead limited and unhappy lives as a result of their disability, but this couldn’t be further from the truth. Most dogs adapt very well to having reduced vision and carry on enjoying life as they did before. Having said that, there are some ways of making it easier for your blind dog to continue playing.

chuckle500Part of the reason it can be more difficult for blind dogs to play is that they have trouble finding their toys in the first place, or they losethem part way through playing, so I have collected a list of toys which make playing easier for blind and partially sighted dogs. Another reason a dog who is newly blind or gradually going blind may lose interest in playing is that they may lose confidence and become depressed. There are plenty of ways to enrich your dog, even if he can no loner see, and by encouraging your dog to engage in play you can help him gain confidence and adapt to a world of smells, sounds, and touch.

WIGGLY-GIGGLY-JACKToys that make a noise while they are being played with can keep your dog interested and make it easier to find if it gets out of reach. Try the Wiggly Giggly range of balls, jacks and dumbbells which are motion activated and make a giggling sound (plus they don’t require batteries!). Along the same lines is the Babble Ball which comes in three different sizes and has a very sensitive motion detector, so your dog can activate the toy simply by walking past. You can choose between ‘wisecrack’ and ‘animal sound’ versions. There’s also the Busy Buddy Chuckle, which is a noise-making bone and treat dispenser in one.

Various toys and balls with bells inside are also available, which are also easy for your dog to find, but you  need to keep an eye on yourdog while playing with these toys because the bell could be swallowed if it is dislodged. There’s also this lovely rattle toy from Petsatges, again for supervised play only!

1085 Orbee-tuff Whistle BallIf your dog loves playing fetch but can no longer see the ball, this whistle ball could be the answer. It makes a whistling sound when thrown so your dog can follow its direction and is vanilla scented to help your dog locate the ball using its nose.

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Finally, try getting your dog to play with any toy with a squeaker; you can add a scent to help your dog find these toys. Movement and high pitched sound are two things which can activate a dogs prey (and play) drive, so if your dog can’t see one, give them the other. If your nerves can’t stand the sound, try this great squeaky toy from Kong – it has an off button!

For more ideas have a look at the great reviews over on www.blinddogtoys.com and look out for our post on Scented Toys.